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Beemer

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Rolling Dice [Apr. 14th, 2015|10:15 pm]
Beemer
So an interesting thing about getting more proficient with R is that, because it's a programming language for statistics, when I want to figure out how to fiddle around with the homebrew rules for my Star Wars RPG, instead of putting a lot of effort into reasoning out whether it'll work the way I want, now my instinct is just try it via simulation and statistical analysis, because that's easier.

Anyway, for our session on Saturday, I finished off the rules for the new task resolution system. It's pretty keen!


Roll Dice, Keep 5

To make a skill check, you roll five six-sided dice, plus extra dice depending on your skill. 

If you have a +2 bonus, you roll two extra dice, rolling seven total. You then discard the two worst results, keeping the five best.  If you have a -2 penalty, you also roll two extra dice, rolling seven total. You then discard the two best results, keeping the five worst. (Bonuses and penalties cancel; if you have +2 and -1, you just roll +1.)

You will always end up with five dice. 

Always Reroll Sixes

If any die rolls a 6, reroll it until you get a result other than 6. Count up the total number of rerolls; this number is used as a significance magnifier in interpreting the results.  So if you end up rerolling a bunch of sixes, whether you succeed or fail, the GM will try to make that skill check have a much bigger narrative influence on the outcome of the scene than a skill check that only has one reroll.

Rerolls will only have a dramatic effect (that is, be a "critical" success or failure) if there are five or more rerolls total.

Success and Failure

When an action is contested or opposed by another action (e.g., an attack vs a defense in combat), both characters roll and the higher result wins.

For an uncontested or static skill check, the GM sets a target (aka Difficulty Class or DC) for the player to beat.

A roll that equals or exceeds the target (static or opposed) is a success.  The amount by which it beats the target is the degree of success of the roll; a roll that exactly equals the target is still a success, but a marginal one with a degree of success of zero.


Difficulty DC
EASY 10
STANDARD 15
HARD 20

Complex Tasks

Some tasks may involve more than one skill from one or more players. These are generally handled by simply summing the DCs from each sub-task and summing the results of all rolls.

Assisting Others

Sometimes one character will try to assist another with a task.  This is handled by swapping dice after the roll is finished.

The helper must roll against DC 12 to assist.  (The DC may be adjusted down to 10 for tasks that are easy to assist with or up to 15 for difficult-to-assist tasks.)

If the helper's check is successful, then the helper and the helpee can swap a number of dice equal to the average of the number of rerolls they got (rounded down).  It doesn't matter who had how many rerolls, just how many total they got together.

For every two rerolls, the helper and the helpee can swap one pair of dice, so long as the helper's check is still successful after the swap.

Helpers can help more than one character at a time.  However, all assistance is based on a single roll, so eventually the character will run out of swappable dice. 

Number is swaps is based on the pairwise number of rerolls.  So if A is helping B and C, and they get 4, 2, and zero rerolls respectively, A can swap three dice with B and then swap two with C.  Dice that have been swapped once can be swapped again, just don't go overboard with it.

A character can be aided by multiple helpers, but the DC to assist goes up by 2 for every helper beyond the first.  (Too many helpers start to get each other's way.)
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